Writing (Even When You Don't Want To)

Greetings everyone! *Sips tea* Today you get to read a post by the 'ol tyrant herself. I hope you enjoy it, because as it turns out she's a baby dinosaur, and they eat people when upset. Anyhow, let us begin!

As I write this I have to say that I frankly would rather not.
I honestly do not want to write just now, not a blog post, not a handful of notes, not even my book. (And I love writing my book, so that's saying something.) Indeed, right now, I have no desire within me to work on this post, nor any other writing project I find myself faced with during this particular moment. Yet I'm still doing it? Why? I dunno. How? That I can tell you.
You know what's funny about writers? We each have instilled within us a deep longing to see our words reach their end. Not permanently of course, just until the next idea butterfly flutters in. We want to see our projects through. We want to finish that paragraph, write that chapter, edit that novel, and yes, hold that finished, in-print book in our hands.
I think it's safe to say that that moment is something we all dream of, no matter who you are or where you are on your writing journey. But if we all long for that day to come, why do we constantly keep ourselves from completing what we have set out to do? We procrastinate, complain and mutter when the time comes to get writing. Ninety percent of us sit down, open a word doc, stare at it a moment, then click the web browser; a writer's escape from words. In all honesty, right now, though I'd rather not be writing at all (Don't you hate it when no one's online?!) I'm writing this blog post when in reality, I'm supposed to be working on my book.
Sound a bit familiar? Well, I'm here hoping I can change that.
You shouldn't be familiar with every escape, every excuse, and every slick way out of getting your words down. In fact, it's this very same familiarity we have with procrastinating that jinxes us half the time anyways. Most of us have likely made a habit of powering on our devices, clicking that dreaded Microsoft Word icon and then promptly clicking open the grand 'ol Google. We can spend hours after this, wandering the great-wide-web, ignoring that little word document nagging at our thoughts in the background; but you know, we can't spend our time that way forever, right?
I read a quote a few days ago: "Experienced authors know it's not the getting the words down that's the hard part, it's the getting down to write the words."
I've never read something writing-related that was so true. Writing is really hard, sitting down to write is even harder.
With all the distractions available nowadays, sitting down to write is even HARDER than it used to be, and it wasn't exactly a picnic before widespread technology either.
So why, or rather, how, is it that I have written this post when, to be honest I'd rather be Netflixing in the corner? Accountability my friends.
I've got people depending on me to start this week off right by posting on my assigned day. But you know, it's more than that. I really don't want to be writing right now, but I want to get it out of the way. I really don't want to be writing right now, but I want to form good writing habits and discipline myself. I really don't want to be writing right now.
But I know I should be.
You should never force yourself to write, I don't care what other people say. But you know, I happen to think forcing yourself to write and making yourself write are two entirely different things. When you force yourself to write you're so busy thinking about the fact that you have NO inspiration, NO motivation, NO real desire to get the words down. When you make yourself write, you choose to write because it's the best way for you to learn and grow as a writer.
A good writer is a consistent writer. A writer who has disciplined themselves to know when to write and when not to is a smart one, and a writer who has trained themselves to be able to legitimately tell the difference is an efficient one.
And a writer who can totally make up a post as they go along is me! ^_^
So here's to the irritable ones sitting behind a computer screen and grumbling to themselves about having to write this stupid (select one: Chapter, Post, Paper, Assignment, Book, etc.) but still doing it anyways. Hats off to you my friends! We all could learn a lot from your dedication. Now stop reading this post and go write something!
Until the Dimming of the Stars, 
Bethany H. Vela

4 comments:

  1. The last sentence is awesome! (Well, the whole post is.) It's a call to action. A toot of a horn echoing out across the internet. Let's get up (or sit down) and do something!

    ReplyDelete
  2. So true, so true...
    Now I'd better go write :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Haha, hey, I think it takes skill to be able to write as you go along! *gives high-five and thumbs up* Excellent job!

    "A good writer is a consistent writer. A writer who has disciplined themselves to know when to write and when not to is a smart one, and a writer who has trained themselves to be able to legitimately tell the difference is an efficient one." - This is great!!

    ReplyDelete